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miscellaneous families, pending webpages for each family continuous additions and expansions..
 
Pomacanthus arcuatus larva,
8.2 mm SL
(San Blas, Panama, SB86-419)
Diagnosis: Angelfish with a modal dorsal fin ray count of D-IX,32 indicates Pomacanthus arcuatus. The related species P. paru has a modal fin ray count of D-X,30. (U)
Description: Text will Go here
 
 
 
 
 
Tomicodon sp. A,
5.5 mm SL
(note bubblewrap skin D-8 A-8 P25)
(San Blas, Panama, SB86-627)
Diagnosis: A clingfish with no patches of papillae within the pelvic disk and no prominences on the front of the lower jaw indicates the genus Tomicodon spp. This larval type has a mode of 8 dorsal and 8 anal fin rays, 25 pectoral fin rays, and 10 caudal fin rays. A number of species have recently been described from the Caribbean in addition to the classic T. fasciatus ((D-7-9 A-6-9 P20-22 C8): T. briggsi, T. clarkei, T. cryptus, T. lavettsmithi, T. leurodiscus, T. reitzae (D-7-9 A-7-10 C8), T. rhabdotus (D-8-9 A-6-8) and T. rupestris (D-7-10 A-6-9).
Description: Text will Go here
 
 
 
 
 
 
Acyrtus artius Acyrtus rubiginosus Acyrtus pauciradiatus (Noronha, Brazil D-7-8 A-6-8 P20-22)
Acyrtops beryllinus Arcos macrophthalmus (D-7-8 A-6-7 P23-25 C10)
Gobiesox lucayanus (P24-26) Gobiesox nudus (D-8-9 A-7)
Gobiesox punctulatus (P21(19-22) C7-9)
Gobiesox strumosus (D-10-13 A-9-11 P22-26 C11-13)
 
 
Opistognathus whitehursti larva,
7.9 mm SL
(San Blas, Panama, SB86-1002)
Opistognathus whitehursti larva,
8.0 mm SL
(note eye tilted forward, D-X,
14 A-III,13 P-19)
(San Blas, Panama, SB87-225)
Jawfishes are morphologically very similar and fin ray counts broadly overlap, making species identifications more difficult. The issue of two vs. three anal fin spines is confused in the literature, where the use of the term "usually" implies a significant number of two-spined individuals in three-spined species. Fin ray counts on larvae argue that two spined larval types should not automatically be assigned to O. gilberti.

Opistognathus aurifrons 11,15-16 III,15-16 19-20
O. whitehurstii 11,14-15 III,13-14 18-20
O. macrognathus 11,16 III,16 19-21
O. maxillosus 11,15 III,15 20-21 usu. II?
O. signatus deep 10 - 11,16 – 17 2 – 3,16–17
O. gilberti 11,13 II,13-14 17-19
O. robinsi fla bahamas 11,17 2-3,16-18 18-21
O. lonchurus 11,12-13 III,12-13 18-20
Lonchopisthus micrognathus 11,17-18 III,16-17 16-19

Diagnosis: A jawfish with fin ray counts of D-XI,14 A-II,13 Pect-18 indicates Opistognathus whitehursti. The fin ray count overlaps the range of O. gilberti (and fits the two anal spines characteristic of O. gilberti), but that species almost always has 13 dorsal fin soft rays. The possibility of a significant number of individuals with two anal fin spines in the other species indicates that this larval type is likely the locally very common jawfish O. whitehursti.
Description: Text will Go here
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Bregmaceros atlanticus larva,
9.9 mm SL
(San Blas, Panama, SB86-1001)
Bregmaceros atlanticus larva,
9.8 mm SL
(San Blas, Panama, SB86-1001)
Not a reef fish, but their larvae and juveniles are frequently encountered in the waters over reefs.
Diagnosis: Text will Go here
Description: Text will Go here
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Centropomus undecimalis larva,
7.1 mm SL
(San Blas, Panama, SB86-1001)
Centropomus undecimalis larva,
6.0 mm SL
(internal melanophores)
(San Blas, Panama, SB86-814)
Centropomus undecimalis larva,
6.5 mm SL
(internal melanophores)
(San Blas, Panama, SB86-826)
Centropomus undecimalis larva,
7.0 mm SL
(internal vertebral melanophores)
(San Blas, Panama, SB86-822)
Diagnosis: Snook with modal fin ray counts of D-VIII,I,10 and A-III,6 indicate the common snook Centropomus undecimalis along with C. ensiferus and C. parallelus. According to the FAO monograph C. mexicanus and C. poeyi usually have nine dorsal fin soft rays (and C. poeyi is only recorded from Mexico to Belize). The sixth Caribbean species, C. pectinatus, has a mode of seven soft anal fin rays and 14 instead of 15-16 pectoral fin rays. It is likely that DNA sequencing will be necessary to distinguish the larvae of species that share fin ray counts. (U)
 
Two basic forms of larvae occur, one with prominent internal melanophores wrapping around the vertebrae at the posterior body and the other without that row.
 
Description: Text will Go here
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Haemulid type 2 larva,
5.5 mm SL
(internal melanophores)
(San Blas, Panama, SB86-702)
Diagnosis: Text will Go here
Description: Text will Go here
 
 
 
 
 
Diagnosis: Text will Go here
Description: Text will Go here
 
 
 
 
 
 
Astrapogon puncticulatus larva,
9.2 mm SL
(San Blas, Panama, SB84-523)
Diagnosis: Cardinalfish with 14-16 pectoral rays indicate the genus Astrapogon. A. puncticulatus has 16 pectoral rays, while A. alutus has 14 pectoral rays and A. stellatus almost always has 15 pectoral rays. (U)
Description: Text will Go here
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Eucinostomus sp. larva,
5.6 and 4.6 mm SL
(San Blas, Panama, SB86-809)
Eucinostomus sp. larva,
7.4 mm SL
(early development of spinous dorsal
fin membrane melanophores)
(San Blas, Panama, SB84-529)
Eucinostomus sp. larva,
5.9 mm SL
(San Blas, Panama, SB87-121)
Diagnosis: Many Caribbean mojarras share the basic fin ray counts of D-IX,10 A-III,7 (or II,8, i.e. ten anal fin elements) and separating genera and species can be difficult. Larvae and juveniles typically have the third element of the anal fin segmented (and not branched in all?). There are seven very similar-appearing Eucinostomus spp: E. argenteus, E. gula, E. harengulus, E. havana, E. jonesii, E. lefroyi, E. melanopterus. Gerres cinereus has a much wider body as an adult, and this feature may apply to larvae. The other two Atlantic genera have eleven anal fin elements: Diapterus auratus (A-III,8; or II,9 in larvae) and D. rhombeus (A-II-9), and Eugerres brasilianus, E. plumieri, and E. mexicanus from freshwater in Mexico and Guatemala.
Description: Text will Go here
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Trachinotus falcatus larva,
7.9 mm SL
(Florida, 5-3-04)
Diagnosis: Text will Go here
Description: Text will Go here
 
 
 
 
 
Scorpaena sp. early transitional larva,
6.6 mm SL
(San Blas, Panama, SB84-517)
Scorpaena sp. transitional larva,
6.5 mm SL
(San Blas, Panama, SB83-179)
Diagnosis: Modal fin ray counts of D-XII,9 A-III,5 indicate the genus Scorpaena. There are a number of very similar species in the Caribbean that share fin counts. S. plumieri is the most common on reefs, but S. albifimbria, S. bergi, S. brasiliensis, S. calcarata, S. grandicornis, and S. isthmensis are among the shallow-water species that cannot be excluded.
Description: Text will Go here
 
 
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
 
Thunnus albacares larva,
5.2 mm SL
(San Blas, Panama, SB84-527a)
Diagnosis: Text will Go here
Description: Text will Go here
 
 
 

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